Peaches

Background Info:

  • Originally came from China
    • In the early 1600s, Spanish explorers brought the peach to the new world
  • There are 2 main types of peaches
    • Freestone – the flesh doesn’t stick to the pit
    • Clingstone – the flesh “clings” or sticks to the pit, usually sold for canning
    • The oval pit needs to be remove before eating
  • Skin is slightly fuzzy
    • Nectarines are a type of peach which have smooth skin without fuzz
  • Size of a baseball
  • Flesh inside is usually yellow but may be white

Nutrition Information (1 medium peach = 1 cup fresh sliced peaches):

  • Calories – 60
  • Protein – 1 gram
  • Carbohydrate – 15 grams
  • Fat – 0 grams
  • Calcium – 9 mg
  • Cholesterol – 0
  • Fiber – 2 grams
  • Potassium – 285 mg
  • Sodium – 0 mg
  • Sugar – 13 grams

Season:

  • Summer

Choose:

  • One with a golden hue beneath the blush that is firm and fuzzy
  • They are ripe when they yield to gentle pressure 
  • Avoid blemishes
  • Green peaches means they were picked too early
  • You can also purchase canned or frozen

Store:

  • If ripe:
    • Store a room temperature for use within 1-2 days
    • Store in the refrigerator in a plastic bag for up to 5 days
  • If unripe:
    • Room temperature, stem side down until ripe
    • o speed ripening, place in a paper bag for a day or two
  • If cooked:
    • Store in a tightly closed container not made from metal in the refrigerator

Prep:

  • Wash in cold running water to remove any dirt
  • Keep cut peaches from turning brown by sprinkling with lemon or orange juice
  • To easily peel, dip peaches cut into halves into boiling water for 30 seconds or until skin loosens
    • Remove the peaches with a spoon and dip into cold water, the skin will then slide off

Cook:

  • Eat as a tasty snack whole, sliced, or chopped
  • Add to yogurt, cereal, or oatmeal
  • Mix into batters for pancakes, waffles, muffins, or bread
  • Blend into a smooth
  • Can also be baked or grilled

 

References

  • Glisan, Maggie. “Prime Time.” Better Homes & Gardens. August 2018. 98.
  • “Peaches”. (2018, July 16). USDA. Retrieved from https://snaped.fns.usda.gov/seasonal-produce-guide/peaches
  • “Peach: Nutrition. Selection. Storage”. Retrieved from https://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/peach
  • “Peaches”. (2012, December). USDA. Retrieved from https://whatscooking.fns.usda.gov/sites/default/files/factsheets/HHFS_PEACHES_FRESH_900205Dec2012.pdf
  • “Peach”. SNAP-Ed, Iowa Nutrition Network and Iowa Team Nutrition. Retrieved from http://idph.iowa.gov/Portals/1/Files/INN/Peach.pdf
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